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Want to Fight Alzheimer’s? Prevention Is the Key

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100 Simple Ways to Prevent Alzheimer's and Age-Related Memory LossWhen it comes to the battle against brain decay, the latest statistics are not promising. Despite increased funding for research and a new wave of pharmaceutical drugs, rates of cognitive decline are on the rise, and most seem to view the battle as hopeless.

Statistics show that if you live into your 80s (which most of us plan to do), your chances of suffering from Alzheimer’s are as high as 50% — not great odds by any stretch. Experts are scrambling to develop new treatments for this devastating disease. But as one “miracle” drug after another fails to live up to its promises, it’s become more and more apparent that there’s a major problem with our approach. The mainstream medical mindset is so narrowly focused on finding an elusive “cure” for Alzheimer’s, that scientifically proven prevention strategies are often ignored.

One expert is sounding the alarm and urging us all to take our cognitive health into our own hands. Acclaimed medical journalist, best-selling author and Stop Aging Now founder, Jean Carper, has written a paradigm-shattering new book titled, 100 Simple Things You Can Do to Prevent Alzheimer’s and Age-Related Memory Loss. In this empowering, practical guide, Jean presents the latest research findings that show how simple diet and lifestyle changes can radically improve your odds of beating brain decay.

This book truly couldn’t come at a better time, given the crisis at hand. The fact is that if you wait until you receive a diagnosis, it may be too late. But you’re never too young or too old to work on prevention.

Joshua Corn, Editor-in-Chief
joshua.corn@stopagingnow.com


Josh Corn Joshua Corn – Editor-in-Chief
Josh is a health freedom advocate and veteran of the natural health industry. He has been actively involved in the natural health movement for over 15 years, and has been dedicated to the promotion of health, vitality, longevity and natural living throughout his career. Josh has successfully overcome several personal health challenges through natural means, and believes that sharing information can empower people to take control of their health so they can solve their own problems and live life to its fullest potential. Josh is the founder and Editor-in-Chief of Live in the Now. Additionally he serves as CEO of Stop Aging Now, a company that has been formulating premium dietary supplements since 1995. Josh is currently working on his first book about natural health, and is gearing up to launch the Live in the Now radio show. In addition to his work in the natural health field, Josh is an avid outdoorsman, animal lover and enjoys “living in the now” with his wife and two sons.


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5 responses to “Want to Fight Alzheimer’s? Prevention Is the Key”

  1. […] Researchers from Tel Aviv University report in the PLoS ONE journal that the common spice cinnamon found in many kitchen pantries around the world may hold a crucial key to preventing Alzheimer’s disease. […]

  2. […] Results from this research provide more motivation for people to work puzzles and visit libraries, as well as read books and newspapers. As Alzheimer’s affects a large portion of the American populace, an estimated 5.4 million, it is encouraging to know that proactive measures can make a difference. […]

  3. […] Researchers from Tel Aviv University report in thePLoS ONE journal that the common spice cinnamon found in many kitchen pantries around the world may hold a crucial key to preventing Alzheimer’s disease. […]

  4. […] Researchers from Tel Aviv University report in thePLoS ONE journal that the common spice cinnamon found in many kitchen pantries around the world may hold a crucial key to preventing Alzheimer’s disease. […]

  5. […] Risk factors for Alzheimer’s are lifestyle related and include ‘ alcohol consumption, elevated cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, dietary fat, obesity, and smoking’ while physical activity reduces risk. These risk factors are important 15-30 years before diagnosis. Many of these dietary factors link to an occurrence of oxidative stress and inflammation in the brain. […]