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Spice Reduces Muscle Soreness

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Exercising has tons of health benefits, but the older we get, the more we may feel the effects of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). I know I feel it. Every time I try something new in the gym, or increase my time or intensity, I feel pretty sore two or three days later.

The muscle tightness can make me feel less excited about tackling my next workout, or make me hold back when I do work out.

That’s why I was excited to see new research suggesting curcumin may offer some help with DOMS without negative side effects.

Curcumin, an component of turmeric (one of the spices in curry) has been said to have anti-cancer, anti-Alzheimer’s and anti-arthritis effects. This new research suggests that curcumin may help with everyday exercise compliance by offsetting some of the negative effects of a vigorous workout. In the study, curcumin reduced exercise-induced inflammation in mice, possibly by inhibiting inflammatory compounds such as COX-2, prostaglandins and leukotrienes. That improved running performance and recovery.[1]

Regular exercise is just what you need to help increase your circulation and flush out inflammation-related toxins that cause muscle soreness. Cross-training, alternating easy and harder work-outs, drinking enough water, heat and massage can help. As proven by this research, adding at least 20 mg a day of curcumin might help even more, without harming your stomach the way popular pain-killers can.

Quick Tip: Jean Carper recommends curcumin for Alzheimer’s prevention. Learn how curcumin can help ward off Alzheimer’s here.

Written exclusively for Stop Aging Now, the authority on anti-aging research, anti-aging nutrition, and anti-aging supplements.

Sources:

[1] Davis, JM, AM J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2007 June; 292(6); R2168-73.

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One response to “Spice Reduces Muscle Soreness”

  1. […] Research suggests that curcumin may help with everyday exercise compliance by offsetting some of the negative effects of a vigorous workout. In the study, curcumin reduced exercise-induced inflammation in mice, possibly by inhibiting inflammatory compounds such as COX-2, prostaglandins and leukotrienes. That improved running performance and recovery. Read More […]