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How to Get the Sleep You Need Without Risky Sleeping Pills

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Get the Sleep You Need - Without Risky Sleeping Pills Last year, several studies were published linking lack of sleep to an increased risk of long-term brain issues, sparking much buzz around the importance of getting deep restful sleep on a regular basis. And researchers aren’t hitting the snooze button on this matter as the evidence continues to mount.

Trust me when I say that diving into this research was both a blessing and a curse. While I found it fascinating, and became eager to educate our readers and customers, it was also pretty scary.

You see, for years I had struggled getting a full night of restful sleep between the stresses of life and the inability to unwind after a long day at the office. The sad thing is that I had spent those years telling myself that getting 4-5 hours of sleep each night was sufficient.

What Your Body Does When You’re Asleep — And Why It’s More Important Than You Think

Unfortunately, we can’t deny the science: While we may think we’re able to function on too little sleep, behind the scenes our bodies and brains are crying for help, breaking down due to lack of repair time.

And the brain fog is hardly a figment of your imagination. While in a restful sleep, brain cells shrink in size, allowing fluid to enter the brain and flush away harmful toxins. The importance of this process was seen in a recent study published in JAMA Neurology, which found that when study participants got less sleep, there were visible signs of it in their brains.[1, 2]

And sadly, Big Pharma’s solution to sleep trouble misses the mark in a big way.

If you ever discussed your sleeping problems with your physician, he or she probably suggested a sleep or anti-anxiety medication. These prescriptions are handed out way too routinely in my opinion. And despite what you’ve been led to believe, these medications are not without risk.

Not only do most people wake up feeling spaced out and drowsy in the morning, sleep medications also carry the risk of dependency and addiction. Worse, they can actually hinder your body’s ability to rejuvenate and restore a natural sleep cycle – which is significantly more important than most people realize.

The way you feel after a night of poor sleep is a symptom of your body’s internal struggle. When quality sleep is lacking, your body can’t repair itself as efficiently, causing your cells to literally age faster. Conversely, re-setting your sleep-awake cycle to one that trains your mind and body to experience better sleep on a consistent basis can lead to some health perks might surprise you. Research has found that getting enough sleep can:

  • Boost energy, focus and concentration [3]
  • Keep your brain functioning optimally as you age [3]
  • Increase your capacity for dealing with stress [4]
  • Support a strong, healthy immune system [5]
  • Keep your cardiovascular system healthy [6]
  • Promote muscle repair and healing throughout the body [7]
  • Fight wrinkles and keeps skin looking youthful [8]
  • Help to keep blood sugar balanced [9]

Needless to say, between the wealth of research underscoring the importance of deep, restful sleep, and the known health perks of getting enough shuteye, I was eager to find a way to ensure a good night of sleep every single night.

After trying a few alternative solutions with little success, I revisited some of the basic facts about the sleep-wake cycle, and was surprised to learn that with age, there can be a dramatic drop off in the amount of melatonin our bodies naturally produce.

You’ve likely heard of melatonin, the “sleepy hormone” that regulates your biological clock by being released in the darker hours of the night, and suppressed during the day, when the body is exposed to light. It’s also known for being a powerful antioxidant, helping to ward off free radicals as your body replenishes and repairs while asleep.

DreamWellChart By the time we reach 40, our melatonin production can be less than half of what it was in our twenties. And when we’re in our sixties it’s about half of that!

The natural solution sounded easy to me: boost melatonin levels for better sleep. Unfortunately, this didn’t work. Turns out, I was taking the wrong kind of melatonin.

If you’ve tried taking melatonin in the past with little success, you’re going to want to hear this, because what I learned about this hormone has been a godsend.

Typical melatonin supplements peak in your body within 3-4 hours. It is very common for standard melatonin to help you fall asleep, but then within a few hours, you find yourself wide awake, tossing and turning in bed until it is time to get up in the morning. The result: you wake up feeling no more rested than you did without taking melatonin.

The key to getting a full night of restful sleep is to make sure you are taking a slow-release melatonin supplement. This way, instead of having all of the supplemental melatonin entering your blood stream at once, and quickly peaking, the slow release action provides you with a steady supply of melatonin throughout the night, just like when you were in your teens and could sleep soundly for hours and hours.

So if you are having trouble falling asleep, or staying asleep, I strongly suggest you give slow-release melatonin a try. Because a full night of restful sleep is one of the best ways to protect your health.

Right now Live in the Now readers can take advantage of a special offer on DreamWell® Melatonin Slow-Release Formula for as low as $16.95 per bottle.

Click here to take advantage of this offer.

References:

1. Xie et al “Sleep initiated fluid flux drives metabolite clearance from the adult brain.” Science, October 18, 2013. DOI: 10.1126/science.1241224
2. JAMA Neurol. 2013;70(5):587-593. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.2334.
3. Lim J, Dinges DF. Psych Bull. 2010 May; 136(3): 375-389.
4. Leproult R, et al. Sleep. 1997 Oct; 20(10):865-870.
5. Irwin M, et al. FASEB J. 1996 Apr; 10(5): 643-653.
6. Hans KM, et al. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2004;43(4):678-683.
7. Adam K, Oswald I. Clin Sci. 1983; 65: 561-7.
8. Kahan V, et al. Med Hypotheses. 2010 Dec; 75(6): 535-7.
9. Donga E, et al. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Jun; 95(6): 2963-8.


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image courtesy of Huffington Post

Josh Corn Joshua Corn -Editor-in-Chief
Josh is a health freedom advocate and veteran of the natural health industry. He has been actively involved in the natural health movement for over 15 years, and has been dedicated to the promotion of health, vitality, longevity and natural living throughout his career. Josh has successfully overcome several personal health challenges through natural means, and believes that sharing information can empower people to take control of their health so they can solve their own problems and live life to its fullest potential. Josh is the founder and Editor-in-Chief of Live in the Now. Additionally he serves as CEO of Stop Aging Now, a company that has been formulating premium dietary supplements since 1995. Josh is currently working on his first book about natural health, and is gearing up to launch the Live in the Now radio show. In addition to his work in the natural health field, Josh is an avid outdoorsman, animal lover and enjoys “living in the now” with his wife and two sons.


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9 responses to “How to Get the Sleep You Need Without Risky Sleeping Pills”

  1. Kim Foxhall says:

    I have tried extended-release melatonin, to absolutely no avail, and have tried just about every other thing available, including essential oils, prescriptions from my doctor, etc. I am at a loss as to what to do for getting a good, restful night’s sleep. I fall asleep just fine, most nights, but toss and turn, every night, and never wake well rested. This has gone on for years, and none of my doctors or naturopaths know how to handle it at this point. Alzheimers runs in my family, and I want to do all I can to avoid it. Any suggestions for someone like me?

    Here’s Hoping,

    Kim Foxhall

    • Al Mon says:

      Let me read this right, you say that time release melatonin does not work! thanks i was going to try it but not now, if it doesn’t work for you I am sure it wont work for me. I am in the same boat with you, there is got to be some way to get a full nights sleep!!!!! ANYONE???

    • Segen Tekle says:

      Hi Kim,
      Studies have shown that maintaining sufficient levels of Vitamins B3, B5, B6, B9 and B12 particularly help in achieving good sleep.
      Among other affects, the group of B Vitamins is involved in regulating the body’s level of tryptophan, an amino acid important for maintaining healthy sleep. I would suggest you incorporate more b vitamins in your daily regimen. Our Max B Complex supplement would be ideal as it contains all 8 members of the B vitamin family. Also, you may want to consider our PurVitality formula to aid in energy production throughout the day! You can find more information on both products by visiting www.stopagingnow.com. Hopefully this helps :)

      • Fred says:

        Lack of B vitamins is a reasonable possibility, so taking a B complex would be a good suggestion, but a note of caution: Don’t take then just before bed. The B’s tend to energize and may keep you awake. You should take them in the morning. Also, B’s are very fragile, and can be damaged by heat (cooking in food) as well as stress in your body. For amount, I suggest you talk to your health care provider (or Naturopath or health store owner.)

    • Tony says:

      supplement with Turmeric.
      Get some capsules from your health-shop and fill a couple of them with curry powder before breakfast
      cheers
      TG

    • Patt says:

      My Mother has alzheminers, and I’ve always said it come from lack of sleep and antidepressants. There has got to be something that can be done for insomminia, I to suffer from it, and have tried many things to no avail.

    • Char says:

      Try 0.5 mg of melatonin (sublingual works best ) approximately 4 hrs before going to bed. The 3 mg at bed. Don’t be tempted to make the 0.5 melatonin any larger, it will actually wake the body if the doses are no adhered to. This was suggested by a Harvard sleep seminar and told to me by my doctor. It seems to help me.

  2. Sandi says:

    Melatonin gives me headaches. It is a common side effect in a small number of users. I’ve tried different brands, amounts etc. any other suggestions?

    • Segen Tekle says:

      Hi Sandi,
      Too much melatonin at one time can cause headaches. A typical dose is 1 to 3 mg per day. Also, try drinking lots of water before bedtime after taking any supplement that contains melatonin to prevent migraines/headaches.

      Hopefully this helps!